Sex and relationships

Friendships & Relationships

Getting to know people and making friends is important not just in school but throughout your life. Friends are people who care about you and you about them; you trust each other and will listen when help is needed. It can be hard to keep friendships and knowing how to manage this can help. Click here for more advice.

Sometimes people try to pressure you to do something or be friends with others that you don’t want to be around. This is called peer pressure. It makes you feel like you can’t be different from others in case they make fun of you or bully you. If this is happening, talk to someone you trust like the school nurse, a teacher or your parent / carer. They can help you but if you prefer to go online check out headscape.

As you grow older your feelings start to change and you will start thinking differently about boys and girls. You may feel ready to start a closer relationship with someone which is exciting. These feelings can be complicated and confusing but you are not alone. Talk to your school nurse about being ready and what a healthy relationship will mean to you. Find out more here.

When you are ready to move your relationship into a sexual one, you need to discuss things like are you both ready for this? Sexually transmitted infections and contraception together and with a health professional. Not sure you are ready or want more information click here.

If your periods have not started by the age of 16, you should now talk to your GP or school nurse.

Your school nurse will be able to sign post you to your nearest contraception and sexual health clinic (CASH). Some school nurses deliver a sexual health offer in school so pop along to the drop in and find out.

For more information on your local Greenwich CASH

Want to know more about what consent means click here

If you have had sex without using contraception, or you think your contraception has failed, you may be able to use emergency hormonal contraception (morning after pill). If you act quickly, this can usually prevent pregnancy.

If you are pregnant and unsure whether or not you want to continue with the pregnancy please click here.

If you are Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans or questioning, more help, advice and support can be found through the Metro and Stonewall

 

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

CSE is a type of sexual abuse. You may feel like you are in a great loving relationship but you are being made to do things of a sexual nature to others for money, gifts or being part of a group.

Talking to a trusted adult or your school nurse about a relationship and sexual health matters sounds easy but can be really hard especially if you may be in a bad relationship. It may be that your friend can’t see what is happening and you need support helping them. More information can be found here but talking things through is always best:

NSPCC  Health for teens

 

Female genital Mutilation (FGM)

It is known that due to our diverse community in Greenwich that it is likely there are women and girls living in the borough who have undergone FGM or are at risk of having this done. Raising awareness is important as research has indicated this practice increases throughout school holidays and girls most commonly undergo this procedure during primary schools age but can happen from any age from birth to 14 years.

The FGM practice is illegal in the UK and deemed a form of child abuse with both physical and psychological consequences. If you need help, support or more information click here.

 

Domestic Violence

Some relationships though can be difficult, demanding and unhealthy. Domestic Violence is a common perception of being physically attacked but it can be something else too. It can also be any incident of threatening behaviour or emotional stuff like puts you down, keeps you away from friends, makes you feel scared, controls you or your money or is jealous, possessive or suspicious of your friendships with others. This can happen to men and women of any age and can be kept away from other people seeing it so it feels hard telling someone or feeling you will be believed.

Help for men

Help for women

 

Forced Marriage

A forced marriage is conducted without the valid consent of one or both partners and is under duress. This can include physical, emotional, financial and/or sexual pressure. A forced marriage is not the same as an arranged marriage which is an acceptable practice as partners have the choice to accept the marriage. Forced marriage can happen to anyone but most involve young women / girls however nearly 20% are male victims.

Help, advice and support can be found here